1. 14:02 11th Jul 2014

    Notes: 1

    An idea from James Wines.

    An idea from James Wines.

     
  2. Banana MRI

    Banana MRI

     
  3. 20:32 20th Jan 2014

    Notes: 1

    This song just ventured deep into the landscape of my mind and brought me to a world I once frequently inhabited, but now rarely venture into. I am very very grateful for the journey.

     
  4. Ambient Yukon Winter. This is actually a really accurate representation of life in this town.

     
  5. 10:20 12th Dec 2013

    Notes: 1

    The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far. The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us little; but some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the deadly light into the peace and safety of a new dark age.
    — 

    H.P. Lovecraft.

    Found it in this, one of a few delightful threads on reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/pics/comments/1spib3/hookah_and_a_laser_pointer/ce0257l

     
  6. Solresol, the creation of a French musician named Jean-François Sudre, was among the first of these universal languages to gain popular attention. It had only seven syllables: Do, Re, Mi, Fa, So, La, and Si. Words could be sung, or performed on a violin. Or, since the language could also be translated into the seven colors of the rainbow, sentences could be woven into a textile as a stream of colors.
     
  7. I fondly recall hiking about in this landscape.

    Thank you Lindsay!

     
  8. "Nearly all people stand in great horror of annihilation, and yet to give up your individuality is to annihilate yourself. Mental slavery is mental death, and every man who has given up his intellectual freedom is the living coffin of his dead soul. In this sense, every church is a cemetery and every creed an epitaph." - Ingersoll: Individuality 1873

    Just about everything of his is available here. Once you start reading any of his speeches, it’s almost impossible to put it down till you’re finished. They really draw you in and it is almost unbelievable how eloquant he can be. Here is what I think is one of his most poetic lines, where he states that the mistake of religion is thinking everything was created for man, and how the world of nature would continue even if man were gone from the earth:

    "This has been the mistake of the world. All the temples have been reared, all the altars erected, all the sacrifices offered, all the prayers uttered in vain. No god has interfered, no prayer has been answered, no help received from heaven. Nothing was created, nothing has happened for, or with reference to man. If not a human being lived, — if all were in their graves, the sun would continue to shine, the wheeling world would still pursue its flight, violets would spread their velvet bosoms to the day, the spendthrift roses give their perfume to the air, the climbing vines would hide with leaf and flower the fallen and the dead, the changing seasons would come and go, time would repeat the poem of the year, storms would wreck and whispering rains repair, Spring with deft and unseen hands would weave her robes of green, life with countless lips would seek fair Summer’s swelling breasts, Autumn would reap the wealth of leaf and fruit and seed, Winter, the artist, would etch in frost the pines and ferns, while Wind and Wave and Fire, old architects, with ceaseless toil would still destroy and build, still wreck and change, and from the dust of death produce again the throb and breath of life." (from Myth and Miracle, 1885)

    — 

    Ingersoll.

    Thanks reddit!

     
  9. 00:16 7th Jun 2013

    Notes: 74

    Reblogged from utnereader

    image: Download

    ilyagerner:

At CC’s Indecision, I wrote briefly about Swifto, a start-up described by FT like so:

Swifto, the “Uber for dog walking”, allows pet owners to “hail” a vetted, insured, and “college educated” dog walker, then track the walk via GPS on their phone.

When the revolution comes, the tech gurus behind Swifto are going to be among the first to the wall, but in the meantime, my friend Trav points out that Swifto’s college-only recruitment policy is a good data point in the debate between the signaling v. human capital models of college education.
Most people — especially educators — would like to believe that the employment-rate and wage premiums that come with a college degree are a result of the skills college graduates have acquired in the course of their studies.
Proponents of the signaling model contend that a college degree doesn’t confer marketable job skills, but it does send a signal to employers that you are a basically competent non-weirdo who will mostly show up on time and fill out the TPS reports without complaint. A four-year education is an experience in hoop-jumping. You have to keep track of major requirements, complete a general education curriculum, submit paperwork on time and be conscientious enough to pass exams. If you do this successfully, you get a degree that shows employers you’re a conformist who can follow direction.
Count Swifto as a one piece of evidence in favor of the signaling camp. It’s hard to believe that specific skills learned as a Biology or Political Science major make one an especially competent dog-walker. But graduating with those — or any major — does demonstrate your work ethic, conformity, and intelligence, all things that employers value.
The other public policy-related lesson here is that the economy still sucks if companies can get away with demanding that their dog walkers have BAs.

Devaluing formal education? Or simply riffing off the more consistent aspects of formal education? What role does formal education really play in the lives of those ‘educated’?

    ilyagerner:

    At CC’s Indecision, I wrote briefly about Swifto, a start-up described by FT like so:

    Swifto, the “Uber for dog walking”, allows pet owners to “hail” a vetted, insured, and “college educated” dog walker, then track the walk via GPS on their phone.

    When the revolution comes, the tech gurus behind Swifto are going to be among the first to the wall, but in the meantime, my friend Trav points out that Swifto’s college-only recruitment policy is a good data point in the debate between the signaling v. human capital models of college education.

    Most people — especially educators — would like to believe that the employment-rate and wage premiums that come with a college degree are a result of the skills college graduates have acquired in the course of their studies.

    Proponents of the signaling model contend that a college degree doesn’t confer marketable job skills, but it does send a signal to employers that you are a basically competent non-weirdo who will mostly show up on time and fill out the TPS reports without complaint. A four-year education is an experience in hoop-jumping. You have to keep track of major requirements, complete a general education curriculum, submit paperwork on time and be conscientious enough to pass exams. If you do this successfully, you get a degree that shows employers you’re a conformist who can follow direction.

    Count Swifto as a one piece of evidence in favor of the signaling camp. It’s hard to believe that specific skills learned as a Biology or Political Science major make one an especially competent dog-walker. But graduating with those — or any major — does demonstrate your work ethic, conformity, and intelligence, all things that employers value.

    The other public policy-related lesson here is that the economy still sucks if companies can get away with demanding that their dog walkers have BAs.

    Devaluing formal education? Or simply riffing off the more consistent aspects of formal education? What role does formal education really play in the lives of those ‘educated’?

     
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